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isp:white_balance [2019/05/09 00:54]
Igor Yefmov [Color correction for white temperature]
isp:white_balance [2019/05/09 00:55] (current)
Igor Yefmov [What is white color temperature]
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 ===== What is white color temperature ===== ===== What is white color temperature =====
-A "​white"​ color has different chromatic characteristics,​ depending on its "​temperature"​. That temperature is traditionally expressed in Kelvin and corresponds to light, emitted by an ideal black body radiator, when heated to that temperature. Think of it as the color of a burning stick of wood at a camp site or a "​red-hot iron" that looks more yellow when it actually melts in a furnace.+A "​white"​ color has different chromatic characteristics,​ depending on its "​temperature"​. That temperature is traditionally expressed in Kelvin and corresponds to light, emitted by an ideal black body radiator, when heated to that temperature. Think of it as the color of a burning stick of wood at a campsite ​or a "​red-hot iron" that looks more yellow when it actually melts in a furnace.
  
 {{:​isp:​color-temperature-1500x600.jpg?​600|}} {{:​isp:​color-temperature-1500x600.jpg?​600|}}
  
-When a scene is illuminated by "​white"​ color there'​s usually color correction needed to bring the "​true"​ colors out. The "​true"​ in this sense is an approximation of how our brains perceive colors during daylight, which is around ​''​6000''​°K.+When a scene is illuminated by "​white"​ color there'​s usually color correction needed to bring the "​true"​ colors out. The "​true"​ in this sense is an approximation of how our brains perceive colors during daylight, which is around ​\(6000°K\).
  
 For our purposes, we are using individual color channel **gains** to compensate for a given temperature. Lower temperature "white light" needs a lot of blue added to it and very little red and as the temperature climbs up, the amount of added red grows while the added blue goes down. For our purposes, we are using individual color channel **gains** to compensate for a given temperature. Lower temperature "white light" needs a lot of blue added to it and very little red and as the temperature climbs up, the amount of added red grows while the added blue goes down.
/home/adminsub2r/public_html/dokuwiki/data/pages/isp/white_balance.txt · Last modified: 2019/05/09 00:55 by Igor Yefmov